Health Tips

Delivering more than just groceries to your doorsteps, SPUD.ca gives lifestyle advice from acclaimed professionals to our riders.

Sustainable Produce Urban Delivery is proud to present Health Tips for the 2012 GranFondo Canada events. Spud.ca has partnered with local health professionals to bring you relevant fitness, health and nutrition tips to help improve your cycling performance come event day.

SPUD.CA TIPS

“Core Values” – February 2013

Cyclists often underestimate the importance of having a strong core and lower back. A solid core not only keeps you steady in your seat, it also helps to maintain a smooth pedal stroke and eliminate upper body movement. Each of these factors contributes to a better (aka faster) ride. Since cycling in and of itself will not increase your core strength, a complete training program needs to include a focused core and lower back strength workout.

Here is a list of exercises to strengthen your core and lower back. All of the exercises (and how-to videos) can be found in past health tips. Combined, they make one killer core workout!

Do each of the following exercises for 1 min. Repeat 2-3 times.

  1. Plank
  2. Supermans
  3. Side Bridges
  4. V Situps
  5. Lying Twists
  6. Plank to Bridge
  7. Bicycle Crunches
  8. Downdog to Plank

Incorporate these exercises into your cool down to round out your next cardio session, and maximize your cycling performance.

"Winter Training" - December 2012

This month's nutritional tip comes from personal trainer Jade giving advice to mix up the off-season training programs to stay in tip-top shape:

"With winter fast approaching most of us will be transitioning to our off season cycling and strength training programs. We'll be logging less time on the road but we can still stay in great shape with a good indoor training program. Some rainy days you'll want to hit the stationary bike trainer but I recommend taking a break here and there by adding some circuit training, skip rope and rowing machine cardio sessions to mix things up. This will help you avoid burn out and give those ligaments a nice break from the repetitive nature of cycling.

Or for an extra challenge, try doing 1 minute rounds of each exercise in order listed finishing the circuit with a 1-2 minute row or skip rope, break then repeat."

"Circuit Training" - November 2012

My clients are often asking me for workouts they can do at home, outside or while on the road. People are looking for great workouts that take little equipment and don't require a gym membership in order to do them.

So this month I thought I'd share a style of circuit training you can do almost anywhere. You'll just need a little space and a yoga mat for the core work. I call this circuit the Dirty Dozen. Pick 12 exercises and do 12 reps of each exercise. Move from one exercise to the next with little to no break in between the exercises, and then repeat the circuit two or more times.

What you'll notice is for some movements 12 reps are easy, for other movements 12 reps is tough! Also you'll have to make a choice when doing some lower body movements like lunges. You have the choice in doing 12 reps in total (6 reps per leg) or 24 reps in total (12 reps per leg).

Here is a list of 12 challenging exercises you can do. There is even an instructional video showing the exercises and variations on some of the movements.

  1. Jump Jacks
  2. Jump Squats
  3. Pushups
  4. Plank to Bridge
  5. Side Lunges
  6. Alternating Lunges
  7. Downdog to Plank
  8. Reverse Lunges
  9. V-Situps
  10. Side Bridges
  11. Lying Twists
  12. Superman’s

Click here to watch the instructional video.

Remember, for max results pair this exercise program with a healthy diet. Check out SPUD.CA for this week’s specials and recipe section to help prepare healthy organic meals on-the-go.

Have fun and feel free to email local health professional Jade with any questions: jade@newyouprogram.com

"Maximum Performance" - August 2012

Race day is fast approaching! By now you are deep into your weekly bike training: long rides, hill practice and sprint intervals. Even though all of this training is essential, don't forget to make sure you are mixing other forms of exercise into your routine as well, in order to maximize your performance.


As I'm sure you know, one of the reasons Lance Armstrong did as well as he did was that he was not afraid to add weight and strength training into his routine. If you haven’t seen this video of him training, it is sure to provide some motivation.

Still not convinced? Maybe this write-up from Olympic athlete and strength coach Charles Poliquin will inspire you to hit the weights. “In a study on cyclists published in the December 2011 issue of Scandinavian Journal of Medicine and Science in Sports, the authors found that a 16-week weight training program yielded these benefits: improved endurance capacity in a 45-minute time trial, increases in type IIA muscle fibres, gains in maximal muscle strength and rate of force development."

Even if you hate the gym and the idea of lifting weights, adding bodyweight exercises into your workout routine can make a big difference. Here is a workout video that I created that will improve leg and core strength and simultaneously provide a great cardio workout. 

All of the instructions on how to perform the exercises and the reps/sets are listed on the video page. 

"Strength Training" - July 2012

Strength training is beneficial to any cycling program if done properly. For many people cycling, it is their activity of choice because it is easy on joints and provides great cardiovascular benefits. Cycling is a lower body dominant activity and adding strength training provides many benefits as it will help increase muscle mass, bone density and when carefully designed, it can balance muscle groups. If you are looking to increase your overall body strength and power, follow the circuit that FLIP Trainings Kinesiology team has developed to add into your regular cycling program.

Gand Fondo Circuit

Warm up with 10 - 15min of cycling on a stationary bike.

Do 10 - 15 repetitions of every exercise that is listed below-repeat 2 - 3 times with a 1 min rest after each circuit:

  • Walking lunges
  • Squat with upright row
  • Alternating chest press on a Stability ball
  • Elbow plank on Stability Ball (hold 30 seconds - 1min)
  • Step up onto bench with Bicep curl to shoulder press
  • Tricep Dips on Bench (legs bent or straight)
  • Leg Curls on Stability Ball

This workout is a sample of how to incorporate full body circuit training into your training regime. Use it for 3 weeks and then if you are interested in learning more contact us at info@flipyourlife.ca. The goal is to create a shift in the way you train and to keep your body guessing.  Be sure to match this regiment with the right nutrition and food intake. Visit SPUD.CA to receive fresh organic groceries delivered right to your door while you’re out training. 

"Microcycle" - June 2012

This month's nutritional tip comes from personal trainer Jade giving advice on Microcycle programs to stay in tip-top shape:

"Summer is here and that usually means nicer weather for our rides which is exciting! At least for a fair weather biker like me it’s exciting.

I've talked in the past how important strength training can be for improving our speed and endurance and since we are nearing the big rides it’s time to start a good periodization training program so we'll be competition ready.

Below we have an example of 3 Microcycles/Stages starting with 6 weeks of muscle building, 4 weeks of strength training, then 2 or more weeks of endurance training. Don't stick with the same weights through each Microcycle. Each week you'll want to see if you can beat what you did the week before in either weight or reps."

Weeks 1 - 6 - Hypertrophy (muscle building phase)

Reps of 8, Sets of 3 (after warm-ups), Load of 60  -80% 1Rep Max, Rest Intervals of 2 - 3 minutes after each circuit.

Weeks 6 - 10 - Strength Phase 

Reps of 3 - 5, Sets of 5 (after warm-ups), Load of 85 - 100% 1Rep Max, Rest Intervals 3+ minutes.

Weeks 10 – 12 + Endurance Phase

Reps of 15 - 20, Sets of 2 - 3, Load of 40 - 50% 1Rep Max, Rest Intervals 1 - 2 minutes.

This style of progressive training will go nicely with the RBC Training Programs here.

"As always training is only one aspect of being truly fit and tracking good race times. The other half of the equation is recovery, nutrition and your mindset. As cliché as that may sound, staying focused, positive, enjoying your downtime and eating clean, play a huge part in staying strong and injury free this summer." 

"Long Ride" - May 2012

This month's nutrition tip comes from the FLIP crew, highlighting the key factors of training for a long ride:

"Cyclists often wonder what the best approach to nutrition is when it comes to training for endurance events such as the GranFondo. Proper nutrition makes a huge difference in your speed, stamina and overall performance. Here are some tips of what to do before the ride, both during and after. Make sure to experiment with nutrition as you train because each body is different; what will work for someone may not work for the other person."

Fuel PRE exercise
It helps energize your workout, settle your stomach, and prevents low blood sugar and its symptoms of light-headedness and fatigue.

When and what should you eat? Your pre exercise snack should be mainly carbohydrate as it empties quickly from the stomach and becomes readily available to be used by the muscles. Timing is different for everyone, but a light 200 to 400 calorie meal, such as a banana and yogourt, or toast with a nut butter at least 1 to 2 hours before a race or training session is appropriate.

Fuel DURING exercise
Have a snack every 45 minutes. This will prevent you from feeling you have “hit the wall” which is a loss of glycogen in your muscles.  Healthy snacks such as dried figs or bananas will help keep you energized to push through.

Stay hydrated. Dehydration enhances the risk of intestinal problems. Learn how your body will react to water, sports drinks, diluted juice and any fluids that you will be drinking during competition. Practice drinking fluids on a regular basis during training. (Roughly 240 ml every 15 to 20 minutes during strenuous exercise).

Fuel POST exercise
Eat within the 45 minute window of opportunity post exercise to nourish, repair and build muscles. Choose a carbohydrate snack with protein (10 to 20 g). Some great examples are a turkey sandwich, protein shake, eggs, and whole grain toast. Ensuring you have fed your body immediately after exercise will help alleviate muscle soreness and fatigue that you might experience later in the day. 

Email greg@spud.ca if you have any questions for the FLIP crew on nutrition or training tips.

"Winter Training" - November 2011

This month's nutritional tip comes from personal trainer Jade giving advice to mix up the off-season training programs to stay in tip-top shape:

"With winter fast approaching most of us will be transitioning to our off season cycling and strength training programs. We'll be logging less time on the road but we can still stay in great shape with a good indoor training program. Some rainy days you'll want to hit the stationary bike trainer but I recommend taking a break here and there by adding some circuit training, skip rope and rowing machine cardio sessions to mix things up. This will help you avoid burn out and give those ligaments a nice break from the repetitive nature of cycling.

Or for an extra challenge, try doing 1 minute rounds of each exercise in order listed finishing the circuit with a 1-2 minute row or skip rope, break then repeat."

"Forgotten Areas" - September 2011

This month's lifestyle tip comes from personal trainer Jade, reminding cyclists to always strengthen those forgotten areas during cycling training to maximize overall performance:

"The focus of any good bike training program will be on improving leg strength, cardiovascular strength and endurance. However when training for a long ride some important groupings of muscles tend to get forgotten. Muscles like the Core and Triceps help support the upper body when bent over the bike for long periods of time (core) as well as help move the bike laterally when moving up hills (triceps).

Adding these 2 simple exercises into your current training program will help bring up the strength of those forgotten areas."

Jade's Exercises:

Bicycle crunches - work up to 100+ reps (Video)

Tricep dips (off a bench/chair or possibly parallel bars) go to failure each time (Video)

"Nutrition" - August 2011

This month's nutritional tip comes from Dr. Peter Bennett highlighting the key factors of recovering after a long ride:

"Athletes should try to manage their recovery strategies before and after a training session. The key points are:

  1. Fatigue
  2. Jet lag
  3. Nutrition/hydration
  4. Physical and mental stress
  5. Poor Immune Function

I strongly recommend going into a race rested so you are tapered on your training, get plenty of sleep, make sure that you have adequate salt intake during the ride, follow the ride with a sweet drink made from fresh fruits, whey powder and some glutamine powder. Glutamine is an amino acid (the most abundant in the human body) that is stored within skeletal muscle tissue. In fact, it makes up half of the amino acids that are stored here. An average person may go through a few grams of glutamine each day; an amount that is easily recovered by the body’s self-repair systems.

However, the endurance athlete requires much more of this essential amino acid in order to reduce oxidative stress and repair damaged muscle tissue. It is the limitation of the body to produce enough glutamine at a rapid enough pace that can limit the body’s ability to repair damaged skeletal muscle and thus slow recovery. However, taken as a dietary supplement after a race or training session, this process can be enhanced and recovery should speed up. Glutamine increases growth hormone levels allowing for muscle development. It also draws water into the muscle and enhances glycogen deposition which creates a favourable environment for further muscle growth. This repair aid coupled with the anti-oxidant effectiveness of glutamine makes it a near magic-bullet to an athlete’s recovery! How should it be taken to obtain the best results?

Glutamine should be taken immediately following a race or training session, and then again about two hours later. Although dosage will vary from athlete to athlete, the average recommended dose is between 2 and 10 grams. With the addition of this supplementation to the athlete’s recovery regime, muscle repair should speed up and optimum performance should be re-attained much more rapidly!"

"Circuit Training" - July 2011

This month's nutritional tip comes from personal trainer Jade McClure, highlighting the importance of circuit training and stretching while preparing for RBC GranFondo Kelowna:

“While most of your training for the upcoming long ride should be done on your bike, make sure to include some circuit training and flexibility sessions if you want to be in top shape come race day.”

"Circuit training will increase your overall strength while also improving your aerobic conditioning. Using free weights in the 50% of one rep max range and doing reps of 15-20 alternate between upper and lower body exercises. Take little to no time between exercises and add a cardio round at the end of each circuit for maximum benefit. Don’t forget to stretch!"

Jade's Exercises:

Dumbbell Chest Press, Dumbbell Bench Step-Ups, 1 Arm Dumbbell Row, Dumbbell Stiff Leg Dead-lifts, (Core) Side Bridges, (1 min) Yoga Plank, 400m Sprint.

"Magnesium Deficiency" - June 2011

This month's nutritional tip comes from Dr. Peter Bennett highlighting the significance of having magnesium in our diet:

"In my clinical practice, magnesium deficiency is the most common finding in athletes, especially cyclists. Studies have shown that cycling increases magnesium loss in the urine, and those who received four weeks of placebo or magnesiumortate improved performance and decreased competition times."

SPUD's Community Health Professionals

Jade McClure

A native to the West Coast, Jade McClure has been actively involved in the fitness industry ever since he noticed the effect exercise had in his mid teens.

Jade takes a very holistic approach to his work, based on the idea that nutrition and lifestyle play a major part in staying fit and healthy. He strongly believes that no matter how hard you train,you won’t see the results you really want unless you eat properly and maintain a balanced lifestyle.

 

 

 



Dr. Peter Bennett ND, RAc, DHANP

Naturopathic Physician

•  Registered Acupuncturist
•  Board Certified Homeopath
•  Author
•  Teacher/Lecturer

Dr. Peter Bennett practices in Langley and Whistler B.C., on the West coast of Canada. Dr. Bennett uses diet, nutrition, herbal medicines, acupuncture, homeopathy, physical medicine and intravenous nutritional medicines to help patients with acute and chronic health problems. He frequently lectures to medical and naturopathic doctors at conferences, teaches at the Boucher Institute of Naturopathic Medicine, and teaches public seminars. Dr. Bennett writes for magazines, and has been a featured expert on the Joe Easingwood Show at CFAX radio, and on the Women’s Television Network.

Dr. Bennett graduated from the University of British Columbia with a BA in Asian Studies in 1980 and completed the -year naturopathic medical school program at Bastyr University in 1987. Dr. Bennett concurrently completed the three-year degree program in Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) at the Northwest Clinic of Acupuncture and Oriental Medicine. He received his Doctorate of Naturopathic Medicine (ND) in 1987 and was selected by his peers for a post-graduate residency training program at Bastyr University. After completing his education, Dr. Bennett returned to his home on a small island off the coast of British Columbia where he worked as a sole practitioner for many years.